20 Vegan Holiday Side Dishes

20 Vegan Holiday Side Dishes

Let’s be honest: I’m really here for the sides.

Entrées are good and all, and breakfast is a given. But sides are where it’s at. (OK, and desserts, but that’s coming, too. Stay tuned.)

Without further ado, my top 20 vegan sides that would make the perfect addition to your holiday spread!

1. Kumquat Kale Salad with Tahini Dressing // 2. Cheesy Cauliflower Rice & Broccoli Bake // 3.

Continue to 20 Vegan Holiday Side Dishes from Minimalist Baker →

Hasselback Potatoes with Kale & Pesto

hasselback_potatoes_1

I posted a photo of some thinly sliced Hasselback potatoes on instagram a while back, mentioning that we would roast them, add kale, beans, onion and cherry tomatoes, slather with pesto and call it dinner. The response was unusually loud for such a humble dinner that we decided to recreate and share this simple recipe here.

I’m sure you have seen this potato technique before – slicing them thinly but not all the way through, drizzling with fat and baking them until the edges are crispy and the middle is creamy and soft. Hasselback potatoes were apparently invented at a restaurant here in Stockholm in the 1950’s, as a method to shorten the baking time. It was an extremely popular dish when I was around Elsa’s age (almost 30 years ago!). My mom made Hasselback potatoes almost as often as she did her famous baked sausage stuffed with pineapple and cheese. And it has seen a revival in the past years now being popular all over the world.

hasselback_potatoes_2

We like to stuff the herbs into the slices to give it more flavor and also helping the fat to find its way inside the potato. The original version uses butter and breadcrumbs but we’re simply using oil. I’m sure some almond flour could be tossed on top towards the end of the baking, if you like it with a little crust. A good trick is to place the potato in a large wooden spoon when you cut it to prevent from cutting it all the way through. Or placing it between two chopsticks. On the photo above, Luise uses a metal spoon which both makes it more difficult to slice because the potato isn’t flat and it can be bad for the knife. So not the best example. What can I tell you, she’s Danish and she doesn’t like to follow my instructions, so I’ll publicly shame her here instead.

hasselback_potatoes_3

With only a few days left to Christmas, I should mention that this also makes an awesome side dish on the Christmas table. It looks really nice on a bed of kale and beans and the pesto makes it extra yummy. We compiled a list of a few other great Christmas related recipes from the archives:

Christmas Spiced Parsnip Cake
Shaved Brussels Sprouts Christmas Salad
Mushroom, Rice & Hazelnut Loaf
Pomegranate, Raspberry & Thyme Jam
Saffron Falafels
Quinoa, Kale & Apple Salad
Homemade Nutella

christmas_app_update

We have also updated our Green Kitchen app with 6 Christmas recipes. Apart from this Hasselback Potato recipe and some favorites from last year, you’ll also find these simple Sesame & Gingerbread Truffles and this delicious Saffron Overnight Oats recipe. Enjoy!

hasselback_potatoes_4

Hasselback Potatoes with Kale, Beans & Pesto

The baking time can vary depending on the potato size and variety. Smaller potatoes will need a little less time.

Hasselback potatoes
2 kg / 4 lbs (roughly 12) large baking potatoes
80 ml / 1/3 cup olive oil
sea salt
black pepper
1 bunch fresh thyme, leaves picked

To serve
3 large handfuls kale, thick stalks removed and leaves roughly chopped
1 small red onion
170 g / 1 cup cooked black beans (1/2 can), rinsed
12 cherry tomatoes
100 g / 1/2 cup pesto (if you are vegan, choose a pesto without cheese)

1. Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F.
2. Wash and scrub the potatoes.
3. Slice each potato thinly. Let each slice cut about two-thirds into the potato, leaving the bottom intact. This is easiest done by placing the potatoes inside a large spoon, the edges of the spoon will then stop the knife from cutting too deep.
4. Tuck some thyme leaves sporadically between the slices of each potato and place them on a baking tray.
5. Use a brush to drizzle the potatoes with about half of the oil and then sprinkle with salt and pepper.
6. Bake for 30 minutes and then brush the potatoes with the remaining olive oil. The potatoes should have started to fan out slightly which will make it easier to get some of the oil down in-between the slices as well. If the slices are still stuck together, you can let them roast a while longer before adding the last oil.
7. Bake for 30 minutes more. Meanwhile, cut the onion in thin slices and place it in a bowl along with the kale, beans and tomatoes. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper and toss to combine.
8. When the potatoes have been in the oven for about 1 hour in total, arrange the onion, kale, beans and tomatoes on the tray, around the potatoes and bake for 15 minutes more, or until the potato edges are crispy and the centre feels soft when pierced with a toothpick.
9. Drizzle pesto over the potatoes and kale and serve immediately, while still hot.

********************

Finally, can we just say a massive Merry Christmas / Happy Hanukkah or whatever you are celebrating! This has been an intense year for us with books, babies and everything. We haven’t been posting recipes as often as we intended but we want to thank you for your constant support and cheering comments. We have lots more planned in the near future so stay tuned. BIG LOVE!
/David, Luise, Elsa, Isac and baby Gabriel

20 Vegan Holiday Breakfast Recipes

20 Vegan Holiday Breakfast Recipes

It’s Christmas week! And that means it’s time for my gift to you: Food.

I love sharing recipe round-ups this time of year, but because we have SO many recipes, I’ve decided to break them into categories instead of doing one giant post like I normally do. Hopefully this makes it more manageable for you and gives you more organized lists to choose from.

I’m starting with breakfast, which I’ve narrowed down to my 20 favorite, most festive recipes.

Continue to 20 Vegan Holiday Breakfast Recipes from Minimalist Baker →

Baked Barley Risotto with Carrots

Baked Barley Risotto with Carrots | @naturalyella

One of the things I try to rally against is that certain types of recipes have to be hard. If you have ever watched almost any cooking show on television, a risotto dish almost always happens. And most likely, it’s hard to nail and they paint it as a tricky dish. This is the reason it took me years to make risotto at home.

However, I believe that there are ways you can make these “trickier” dishes at home with stellar results. This baked barley risotto is a perfect example. The barley lends a chewy quality while roasted carrots are pureed with mascarpone cheese for the creamy aspect. My favorite part? Most of the time involved in this recipe is hands-off, oven time.

Read more and see the recipe.

The post Baked Barley Risotto with Carrots appeared first on Naturally Ella.

Candied Spiced Nuts (1 Pan!)

Candied Spiced Nuts (1 Pan!)

It’s countdown to Christmas over here and I’m freakin’ out.

If you’re like me, you’re a terrible gift planner/giver/buyer/etc., and it’s now too late to purchase anything meaningful.

But, like me, you likely have one redeeming quality: You love food and always have it around. Let’s use our kitchens as a resource and make candied nuts, shall we? Who doesn’t love the gift of food?!

These nuts are extra, extra easy because they require 9 basic ingredients, about 15 minutes to make, and 1 PAN.

Continue to Candied Spiced Nuts (1 Pan!) from Minimalist Baker →

Toasted Almond Sables

When I go to flea markets or stop by a neighborhood garage sale, I always find myself rummaging through weathered cardboard boxes looking for cookie cutters. Vintage ones, distinctive ones. You might imagine I have drawers full of them, but that’s not actually true. I have two small shoe-box sized containers of cookie cutters. That’s it. It doesn’t actually feel like a lot to some who loves to roll and stamp cookies as much as I do, but the good ones are hard to come by. Beyond shape, I have a fondness for metal cutters with sharp edges, and good structure. Shapes that can cut cleanly through a currant or dried cranberry if need be. Today, I thought I’d show you a few of my scores, and share a favorite cookie-cutter friendly recipe as well.

Toasted Almond Sable Recipe

So, I love my Swedish heart cookie cutter. It’s roughly the size of my palm and is perfectly symmetric. Here’s the thing. Hearts are a popular shape for cookie cutters, yet each heart is an individual. Some plunge deep, some curve shallow and soft, some are wide and squat, some are tall and elongated…each one says something different with its shape. There are friendly hearts, serious hearts, sophisticated hearts. It’s a personal preference, but I tend to like the hearts that are just about as wide as they are tall. Symmetrical, direct, with clean lines.

Toasted Almond Sable Recipe

Then there are the wild card cookie cutters that I can’t pass up. Like this farmhouse collection. The shapes get a bit mushy over the years, but the primitive lines are charming and the patina on the cutters beautiful. The pig has apparently escaped – note to self to find him.

Toasted Almond Sable Recipe

I’ve been making tiny shortbread in the shapes of small hearts, diamonds, spades, and clubs since I was a kid, and tend to prefer tiny cutters for butter-rich cookies. They’re the type of cookies where a couple make the perfect accompaniment to an afternoon coffee or tea. Today’s cookies qualify, and I picked the teardrop shape.

These toasted almond sable cookies are a take-off on Alice Medrich’s charming Whole Wheat Sables, published in Pure Dessert a few years back. I love them, and make them a number of different ways depending on what I have on hand. This variation is hard to beat – toasty, nutty, peppered with dried currants. They’re made with whole wheat and all-purpose flours, sliced almonds, and the best butter you can come by. That said, I made another variation with June Taylor’s candied citrus peels for the Little Flower School class a couple weeks back – swapping finely chopped peel for the currants you’ll see in the recipe below. The peel left lovely little slashes of color throughout the cookies, and bursts of citrus flavor. I really loved those too.

Toasted Almond Sable Recipe

For those of you who’ve made it this far. I made a note to myself for next time. I’m excited to try this recipe using Dorie’s trick of using cultured butter – for a hint of tang. It might be the thing to put these right over the top.

Continue reading Toasted Almond Sables…

Limoncello Macaroons

I packed a number of things for last weekend’s getaway to Mendocino. One pair of flip-flops, one book, a stack of magazines, a bottle of bubbles, ten rolls of film, three cameras, a tripod, and a bag of limoncello macaroons. I bookmarked these Pinched Orange Macaroons a while back, and when my sister gave me a bottle of limoncello (made from lemons in her yard), I decided to do a twist on Patrick Lemble’s cookies using the homemade citrus liqueur and zest. I thought they’d be a nice little treat for the cabin. The cookies are made primarily from almond paste and they bake into golden-crusted, powder-coated, almond-citrus gems. A tad messy to make, but well worth it.

Limoncello Macaroon Recipe

Before we dive into the minutiae of macaroon cookie making, I thought I’d share a few photos. For those of you who have missed previous mentions of the cabin, it is waaay off the grid, and a bit rustic – in the very best way possible. I like to sit on the porch and do a whole lot of nothing. We played board games and cards, cracked jokes, and talked a lot about the mountain lion that has been spotted at the cabin over the past few months.

Limoncello Macaroon Recipe

The mountain lion seemed like an abstract concept to me. Abstract in the way that I know there are bears around when I go camping, but I don’t really think about it much because they don’t bother me. There’s a difference here. This mountain lion has apparently killed a couple goats in the area. And then, there’s that photo up above. Lori & Lisa’s cousin rode down the driveway on his quad one afternoon to show us. He’d rigged a motion capture camera near his cabin, just up the road a bit, and apparently the camera captured that frame. It’s hard to tell from my picture, but I assure you, that cat is large.

Limoncello Macaroon Recipe

So, for the most part we stuck around the cabin. Or traveled in a pack when we were out and about. On the food front, Lori made an amazing grilled eggplant, arugula, and mozzarella salad as part of our dinner Saturday night, and if she posts it or publishes it at some point, I’ll be sure to link to it and give you all the heads up. Strong, garlicky, and good. She makes a mean panzanella as well.

Limoncello Macaroon Recipe

As far as the limoncello macaroons are concerned, let me say a few things. First off, they travel quite well. And while they seemed to be at their absolute peak roughly thirty minutes after baking, I placed the cooled cookies in a sealed plastic bag, and they were delicious for days. There wasn’t as much textural difference between the outside crust and the super-moist middle after being bagged, but they were still 90% as good.

Limoncello Macaroon Recipe

They’re also made from one of the simplest batters imaginable. I made one batch following Patrick’s original technique, then took a shortcut with the second batch which you’ll see reflected in my version of the recipe below. In short, I found I didn’t really need to do an egg wash/powder. I found the dough was quite moist. I threw a good amount of powdered sugar down on the counter top and shaped the cookies from there. They had a nice powdered sugar coating without the extra step. If you find you’re not getting enough of a powdered sugar coating before baking, give each ball of dough a light brushing of egg white and a quick roll in more powdered sugar.

Continue reading Limoncello Macaroons…