Category Archives: Uncategorized

Summer BBQ Tofu Vegetable Kebabs

Take advantage of what’s left of summer cookouts with these mouthwatering Summer BBQ Tofu Vegetable Kebabs. Keep that plant-based eating going by enjoying these with friends on the weekend or for a quick add-on to your veggie meal. We love these because they’re super simple with zero sacrifice to flavor. Pop them on the grill and […]

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The post Summer BBQ Tofu Vegetable Kebabs appeared first on Food Heaven Made Easy.

New-fashioned Oatmeal Pancakes

Let’s talk pancakes. A few of you saw a pancake batter in a refrigerator shot I posted here, and requested the recipe. They’re a current favorite for reasons I’ll list off below, but let me describe them to you first. We’re talking about oatmeal pancakes, but I think of them as oatmeal porridge pancakes because of the texture you experience as you cut through their golden tops into the crumb. Instead of a traditional crumb, you’ve got what ends up being a leavened porridge. If you prefer a feather-light stack, these aren’t going to be your jam. These are hearty, substantial, and absolutely delicious. They’re also made with 100% whole grain flour, oats, and ground flax. I always get questions about buttermilk substitutions, so I make them with a simple almond “buttermilk” here. They’re pancakes that will work for vegans, and those avoiding dairy as well. I’ll add a couple of technical notes down below, related to ingredients and favorite add-ins, but I typically make them to order on a Saturday or Sunday, and then save any extra batter to use in the next day or two. They’re like 90% as good with leftover batter – which, in my book, is just fine on a Monday morning ;).

Oatmeal Pancakes

A couple notes – you see cornstarch or brown rice flour here to counter-balance some of the moist density you get when cooking or baking with oatmeal or whole grain flours. You can certainly leave it out – but I’m always a bit sorry when I do. Toppings? I tend to skip the syrup with here, but love to dust them with cinnamon sugar. It gives you that crunch and texture before a tender interior (sort of churro-like). Or, if we’re getting extra specific, sometimes I’ll make a big oatmeal pancake and cut it into 4 or 5 long strips. And then when I want to take a bite, I’ll roll one of the strips (cinnamon roll-style), and dunk the end in a bit of sugar. You also cant go wrong with a side of smashed berries.

Oatmeal Pancakes

I mix all sorts of ingredients into the batter from day-to-day, but it’s hard to beat toasted walnuts and blueberries (frozen is a-ok). Grind up a few rose petals with some sugar and use that to sprinkle – there is something magic about the blueberries and rose. Enjoy!

Oatmeal Pancakes

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Tomato Chutney Omelette

Tomato Chutney Omelette | Naturally Ella

The slow decent into fall has started in our home. There’s been a couple nights with the windows wide open (a welcome relief), school is back in session, and my itch to can is in full-force. In the past few weeks I’ve managed a few different pear items and pickles. Up next: tomatoes.

This tomato chutney omelette is a perfect reason why you should can tomatoes. The chutney is a favorite of mine because it’s fairly easy but packs a wonderful slight sweet, slight tangy flavor. Pair that with a good amount of fresh herbs and it’s easy to have a meal. Tomato chutney is one of those rays of lights during the mid-winter grey.

Read more and see the recipe.

The post Tomato Chutney Omelette appeared first on Naturally Ella.

Simple Spiralized Summer Salad w/ Peanut Sauce Dressing

Disclosure: This post was created in partnership with BELLA Housewares. Thank you for supporting the growth of Food Heaven! As Registered Dietitians who counsel hundreds of people on improving their diets and overall health, our nutrition recommendations can typically be summed up into three simple words: eat more plants. By plants we mean anything that […]

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The post Simple Spiralized Summer Salad w/ Peanut Sauce Dressing appeared first on Food Heaven Made Easy.

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

Beet_tartare_with_labneh_1

Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/tartar with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!).

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_2

We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love?

So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartare (mixed minced beets), dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down to it right away).

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_4

This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive, creamy and delicious with plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too.

You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe – only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless.

Okay, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to roar like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Enjoy the recipe and check out info below re Amsterdam. Ciao!

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_5

Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh
Serves 4

Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC.

Sesame labneh
2 cups / 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt
1/2 tsp salt
2 tbsp tahini
1 tbsp olive oil
Beet Tartare 
1/2 kg / 1 lb  beetroots
2 tbsp capers
juice from 1/2 lemon
1 tsp horseradish (or mustard)
1 handful fresh dill
1 handful fresh mint leaves

salt & pepper
Topping
1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped
fresh dill, chopped
fresh mint leaves, chopped
2 tbsp capers, halved
lemon slices
olive oil
Serve with
rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices
Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil.
Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too much though or you will end up with a sauce. You can also dice them finely. Arrange the beet tartare on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve with crackers or thin rye bread crisps (thin rye bread pieces toasted in a pan or the oven for a couple of minutes), tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices to scoop with.

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_6

Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast

We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot.

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_7

AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP – 7-9 September.

Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks.

We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here.

We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl

Sweet Corn Polenta with Roasted Tomatoes and Avocado

Sweet Corn Polenta with Roasted Tomatoes and Avocado | Naturally Ella

Post sponsored by California Avocado. See below for more details.

Even though we don’t have any little guys in school, Mack’s schedule is such that it feels like he is in school. I pick him up from care at 3:30 and from there it’s a long slide into dinner. He’s in the kitchen “helping” me but most of the time I’m throwing together something simple so that I can play with him. This sweet corn polenta takes a little prep and time but it’s so delicious this time of year, it’s worth every bit of time.

Using sweet corn for fresh polenta is nothing like using polenta from the bulk bin. The flavor is all summer corn. Add to that the tomato-avocado salad, it’s the best of summer in a bowl. For this polenta, I like to use just-rip avocados. They hold their shape a bit better when cubed and tossed with the warm tomatoes.

Read more and see the recipe.

The post Sweet Corn Polenta with Roasted Tomatoes and Avocado appeared first on Naturally Ella.

Beet Tartar with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_1

Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home (we’re also coming to Amsterdam in September – more info below). We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class at Sur La Table and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/tartar with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!).

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_2

We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love?

So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartar, dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down now).

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_4

This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive and got plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too.

You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe – only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless.

Okey, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to scream like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Ciao!

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_5

Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh
Serves 4

Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC.

Sesame labneh
2 cups / 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt
1/2 tsp salt
2 tbsp tahini
1 tbsp olive oil
Beet Tartar
1/2 kg / 1 lb  beetroots
2 tbsp capers
juice from 1/2 lemon
1 tsp horseradish (or mustard)
1 handful fresh dill
1 handful fresh mint leaves

salt & pepper
Topping
1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped
fresh dill, chopped
fresh mint leaves, chopped
2 tbsp capers, halved
lemon slices
olive oil
Serve with
rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices
Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil.
Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too long or you will end up with a sauce. You can also chop them finely. Arrange the beet tartar on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve!

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_6

Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast

We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot.

Beet_tartar_with_labneh_7

AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP – 7-9 September.

Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks.

We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here.

We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl

Chimichurri | Cooking Component

Chimichurri Verde | Naturally Ella

We are a sauce family. It’s one of the food items my husband is most opinionated about. He’s usually a sport with most things I make but his top complaint is when something doesn’t contain a sauce. Because of this, sauces make up a large portion of my component list. Like this chimichurri verde, most are quick and fresh- a perfect companion for vegetables (and some fruits!)

I’ve found the history behind chimichurri not very solid. Most references are that it hails from Argentina but with no specific origin. There are a few theories about where it came from and the name behind- this article gives a brief rundown. Chimichurri is mainly linked with grilled meats (specifically steak) but as mentioned, it’s a wonderful companion for vegetarian cooking.

Read more and see the recipe.

The post Chimichurri | Cooking Component appeared first on Naturally Ella.

Green Bean Curry

Green Bean Curry | Naturally Ella

In the realm of curries, it is hard to pick my favorite. There are so many different flavors that one could highlight through fresh herbs and spices. One of my go-to sauces in the past year has been this green curry sauce. It’s a loose riff on Thai green curry. Traditionally, green curry that comes from central Thailand is made with shrimp paste, kaffir limes, and green thai chilies (specifically prik kee noo suan).

My green bean curry variation leaves out the shrimp paste and uses readily available ingredients like regular limes and jalapeño peppers. If you can find the more traditional ingredients, I recommend making your own green curry paste (this is a shrimp version and this is one without). However, you can often find green curry paste at the store (the flavor just isn’t as strong/good as homemade!) Read more and see the recipe.

The post Green Bean Curry appeared first on Naturally Ella.

Podcast: Choosing Safer Beauty & Body Products

Today we’re going to be talking about natural beauty and body products. This topic has become increasingly popular, and since what we use on our bodies impacts our health, I thought it would be great to make this topic an episode. We’re chatting with Megan Roosevelt, who’s a registered dietitian and the founder of Healthy […]

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